Minecraft First Day Survival Strategies

Since the very first day starts, the participant will have to collect timber (a.k.a. wood). To begin with, the participant must look around then proceed towards some other trees. The participant should collect at least 5-8 cubes of timber logs out of trees by holding down the left mouse button while their cursor is on the block. This is enough wood to craft the basic tools and items the player needs immediately, though you’ll certainly want more a little later.

When the player opens up their inventory (E by default), they will see the inventory window.

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The player’s avatar takes up most of the upper portion, The inventory below is the space for the player’s items. The bottom 9 slots are the usable slots, called a hotbar. Four armor slots are to the left of the player’s character (ignore those for now, they don’t become useful until much later on), and a 2×2 square to the right of the character as the player’s personal crafting grid, which can be used to craft a few basic items. By clicking the recipe book (5) the player can easily craft items in this grid. Place the wood logs into any space in the crafting grid, and wooden planks will appear to the right of your wood. Left-clicking the planks will cause the wood to disappear and planks to appear as a newly crafted item. Once you have the planks in your hand, you can drag them down to your inventory, and place using the left click.

Four wooden planks can in turn make a crafting table ( place 4 wooden planks in a 2×2 square ) and place the crafting table to use it. Right click your crafting table to access it, this crafting grid is a 3×3 square, big enough for all of the craftable items in Minecraft. The first tools the player should craft are a wooden pickaxe and a wooden sword. If any stone blocks are exposed close by, the player can mine them with a wooden pickaxe for 19 blocks of cobblestone. This is the amount the player needs to create every basic tool they’ll need for this tutorial: a sword, a pickaxe ( you’ll need the upgraded pickaxe for iron and other blocks ), an axe, a shovel, a hoe, and a furnace. You’ll need the furnace to cook meat for food and smelt any ore you mine with your pickaxe. Once the player has a stone axe, they should try to get more wood as time allows; extra wood is useful in many ways, from securing and equipping your base to making charcoal, or simply crafting into planks for quadruple the number of building blocks.

If all goes well, the player can obtain coal quickly. With the sticks they made from their wooden planks and some coal, they will be able to make torches (coal above a stick on the crafting grid). With torches in hand, you can make for the nearest cave, because iron ore is your next goal. Underground will actually be safer than the surface when night falls, so mining the first night away isn’t a bad idea at all. On the other hand, if night is falling and you haven’t found coal, use to furnace to smelt more wood (“logs” , not planks ) to create charcoal, a substitute. ( Additionally, you are able to gather 3 blocks of wool from sheep and combine it with three planks to make a bed. With this you can sleep through the night without the worry of monsters killing you. The downside of this is wasting sunlight the next day mining, or working indoors. )

Night time

For night time, the primary danger will be hostile mobs (monsters) that only spawn in the dark. These include zombies, skeletons, and spiders. It is a good idea to stay in a well-lit shelter (see below).

If you’re really seeking adventure you could always arm yourself with a stone sword and go fight some mobs; you might be able to get some materials for further crafting and some early experience levels, which will come in handy later on. However, all of these monsters will either die (zombies and skeletons) or become less dangerous (spiders) when morning comes, and it will be much easier to fight them later when you have better equipment. If you must fight monsters this early, be especially wary of skeletons; in the open their arrows can kill you at a distance, and if they’re in the water or on higher ground, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to reach them before they turn you into a (dead) pincushion. If you happen to see any of the more powerful monsters, keep well away from them: At this point an enderman, witch, or even a creeper can kill you easily.

If you are repeatedly getting killed ( perhaps you got too ambitious, a monster got into your shelter, or you didn’t manage to make a shelter ), one desperate response would be to go into ” peaceful difficulty” (see “changing the rules”, below). However, consider this: This being your first day, you aren’t actually losing much until the deaths (at least not after what stuff you’ve gathered is lost ), so you can just tough it out until dawn and start again. Keep on practicing killing mobs until you get the hang of it.

Shelter

As noted above, you really want to find or make some kind of shelter before your first night, because you won’t want to be killed. The “Shelters” article above gives a lot of emergency shelters and then more advanced ideas, but it only takes a little thinking ahead to manage a decent shelter for your first night. As you move around collecting wood and so on, look at the landscape for potential homes. Easiest (if you can find it) is a small cave with a single entrance that you can wall or fence off. If it’s not quite ideal, consider if you can fix it quickly — say, fencing off a back door to deeper caves. If you don’t have a cave, you may be able to make one, by simply digging into a mountainside or even roofing over a small valley. If instead you have wide, flat space, then go ahead and build a small house. In all cases:

Don’t be too ambitious the first night, because you want it safe before dark, and you also want to light up the space you claim. You can always expand and decorate your home later, or even rearrange the landscape around it.

When picking your location, it’s good to have a view of the landscape so you can see if any monsters are waiting for you in the morning.

Learn about the awesome powers of wood: Fences can be used not only in the obvious way, but as windows or transparent walls, with fence gates to get in and out. Doors provide a full-height option, but you’ll want to surround them with solid blocks (planks, stone, even dirt, but not fences). A few properly-placed ladders can make it a lot easier to get up to your roof or up a hill. A chest will also be useful — stash anything you’re not going to use soon, so you don’t have to worry about it if you happen to get killed.

If you can manage to make a bed early on, place that in your shelter and use it the first night you have it. Getting killed is much less painful when you respawn into a safe place! After the first night, you may well want to spend the nights crafting and mining.

Light

Monsters can’t spawn within 24 blocks of you, but huddling in the dark is no fun — and when you do leave your home, you don’t want to come back to find a monster has moved in. So, you need to light up your space, and at this point, the light you have is torches. A single torch gives enough light to prevent monster spawns completely within a 7 block range (barring obstructions), and reduce them for about the same distance past that. That includes horizontal and vertical steps, so the safe zone only runs 3 spaces or so diagonally. Even outside the safe zone, having some light will sharply reduce the chance of monsters spawning ( depending on how much light), but it’s better to use enough torches to keep your whole home well-lit. If you have extra torches after that, try to light some space outside your home (or at least the entrance ) too, to push back the area where monsters are likely to spawn.

Food and hunger

Once you have tools and shelter, your next priority will be food. Hunger will take a while to hit, so it shouldn’t be a problem on your first day, but you should try to pick up some food for when it does. However, after you’ve been moving around for a while, your food bar will begin rippling and start to decrease. If your food bar drops below 90%, you will not regenerate health, and if it gets to 30%, you can’t sprint. If the hunger bar goes down to empty, you will begin losing health. Unless you’re in Hard mode ( and a beginning player shouldn’t be), you can’t actually starve to death, but you will go down to 1 health point in Normal mode or half your health in Easy mode, and that leaves you quite vulnerable. You don’t lose hunger in Peaceful mode, so you don’t have to worry about that.
In recent versions of Minecraft, the primary drain on your hunger is from healing damage. You will have a little grace period (see “saturation” on the Hunger page ) when starting the game and after eating, but when that’s exhausted, healing a single point of damage (Half Heart. svg) costs the equivalent of 1 . 5 hunger points ( that’s 3/4 of a visible “shank”). Avoid taking falls of more than 3 blocks, drowning or burning yourself, or otherwise taking damage that you will need to heal.

A few other activities also cause hunger, though more slowly:

Fighting: Both attacking mobs and receiving damage cost hunger, even before you start trying to heal damage. (60 blows either way, matches healing Half Heart. svg. ) You will need to slaughter a few animals but pick your fights carefully. Taking damage in other ways counts for this too, but each time you take damage it counts as one ” blow ” no matter how much damage you took.

Sprinting. If you double-tap the forward movement key (W by default), or press your sprint key (Left Ctrl by default), you will sprint. This moves somewhat faster, but it also uses up food. (60 meters matches healing Half Heart. svg. ) However, if you happen to have a sufficient amount of food in your inventory, you can always do it your way.

Jumping. Obviously, you’ll need to jump some just to get around, but don’t bounce around randomly or unnecessarily. (120 jumps matches healing Half Heart. svg. ) Sprinting jumps are especially costly, 4 times as much as a regular jump, although they are the fastest mode of transportation early in the game. Swimming and mining blocks cost a little hunger, but those are minimal compared to the items above.

Note that if you’re (staying) at full health, and not fighting , sprinting and/or jumping, or mining blocks, then you will use no food. Thus, if your character has a secure place to stay, you can just stay put to conserve food while waiting out the night, a storm, or crop/animal growth.

Consider making a basic crop farm immediately after you have settled in a place. Wheat is where you’ll begin:

You can use harvested wheat to make bread. You can obtain it easily using seeds collected by breaking grass. When harvesting wheat, you can use the wheat/seeds to breed cows and chickens, thus having a better food source.

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